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The Lady of the Camellias (Continental Classics)

by Alexandre Dumas

ISBN 0862992648 / 9780862992644 / 0-86299-264-8
Publisher Sutton Pub Ltd
Language English
Edition Softcover
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Book summary

Book may have numerous typos, missing text, images, or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1902. Excerpt: ... "That's true. And yet you were already in love with me." "Yes." "And that didn't hinder you from going to bed and sleeping quite comfortably. One knows what that sort of love means." "There you are mistaken. Do you know what I did that evening, after the Op6ra Comique?" "No." "I waited for you at the door of the Cafe' Anglais. I followed the carriage in which you and your three friends were, and when I saw you were the only one to get down, and that you went in alone, I was very happy." Marguerite began to laugh. "What are you laughing at?" "Nothing." "Tell me, I beg of you, or I shall think you are still laughing at me." "You won't be cross?" "What right have I to be cross?" "Well, there was a sufficient reason why I went in alone." "What?" "Some one was waiting for me here." If she had thrust a knife into me she would Vol. 13--7 III not have hurt me more. I rose, and holding out my hand. "Good-bye," said I. "I knew you would be cross," she said; "men are frantic to know what is certain to give them pain." "But I assure you," I added coldly, as if wishing to prove how completely I was cured of my passion, "I assure you that I am not cross. It was quite natural that some one should be waiting for you, just as it is quite natural that I should go from here at three in the morning." "Have you, too, some one waiting for you?" "No, but I must go." "Good-bye, then." "You send me away?" "Not the least in the world." "Why are you so unkind to me?" "How have I been unkind to you?" "In telling me that some one was waiting for you." "I could not help laughing at the idea that you had been so happy to see me come in alone when there was such a good reason for it." "One finds pleasure in childish enough things, and it is too bad to destroy such a pleasure when, by simply leaving it alone, one c... [via]