Michael Freeman (Freeman , Michael)

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More editions of The Low Light Photography Field Guide: The essential guide to getting perfect images in challenging light:

  • Berg, Ivar E.: Managers and Work Reform: A Limited Engagement
    Managers and Work Reform: A Limited Engagement
    by Ivar E. Berg, Marcia K. Freedman, Michael Freeman
    ISBN 0029029007 (0-02-902900-7)
    Hardcover, Free Pr

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  • Michael Freeman's Digital Photography Reference System: The Complete Photographer's Library, in a Box
    by Michael Freeman
    ISBN 0240813146 (0-240-81314-6)
    Hardcover, Focal Press

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    Book summary:

    Selected Images from the Michael Freeman Digital Photography Reference System

    Just fitting the frame: two Sudanese boys using simple but effective guinea-worm filters. A slightly weird portrait: one of hundreds of cosplay enthusiasts gathered in Tokyo, dressed as their favorite anime characters. Beauty in the ordinary: straight from the supermarket, a block of dried noodles comes alive with backlighting. Wildlife moments: In wildlife photography, always look for moments of behavior and action--here, an oxpecker in position as the hippo yawns.
    Amazon Exclusive: A Letter from Michael Freeman on the Michael Freeman Digital Photography Reference System

    Dear Amazon Readers,

    And now for something completely different . . .

    The way photography is moving in these digital days means that its much more than simply shoot and then hand the results over to a processing lab. Theres the digital workflow even as youre out shooting, then the processing, captioning, archiving, and delivery. This is on top of the core photographic skills of managing the camera and equipment and . . . arguably the most important of all, how to see and compose strong, interesting images.

    So we thought, lets tailor a complete reference system so that each part is in exactly the perfect format, from a wallet-sized on-the-spot shooting guide to a DVD tutorial to a large-format book on composition, lighting and all the essential imaging techniques. Seven items in all, packed in a neat aluminum case. Here, though, I thought Id chip in a little something extra: how the cover shot for the big book, The Art of Digital Photography, was shot. This isnt actually in the book, so this is just for you Amazon readers.

    What Ive always liked about this image is its simplicity, color, and texture. It came about when I was shooting a book on contemporary Japanese design and interiors. This was a brand new house for a well-known theatre director, built on the coast of Okinawa, and it had a very special tea-ceremony room. This kind of room, uniquely Japanese, is incredibly formal, like the tea ceremony itself. But in this case the owner and architect wanted to do something different and break the rules. One rule is that the room has to have an alcove, and hanging in that alcove is a scroll painting or ink brush painting of scenery. What they did instead was make a long narrow window the same size as a painting, arranged so that it has a precise view of the side of a large rock, and the sea, which I thought was a very neat idea. The alcove should also have a small vase or pot with a single flower, but the design here was a massive red-lacquered slab with a circular depression carved and polished into it.

    We poured a little water into this, and placed an orchid bloom to float in it. After Id photographed the entire room (a tricky double-exposure problem, by the way), I went closer in. The way that the light from the narrow window caught the polished lacquer and the water surface was almost sensual, and certainly abstract, while the intricate and delicate texture of the orchid anchored the shot in reality. I used a 105mm Nikon macro lens--an old companion of mine--stopped it well down to between ’16 and ’22, and explored. In cases like this, where you know the effect of light and reflections will change with the tiniest shift in camera position, the thing to do is keep the camera to your eye and move around with it, looking only through the viewfinder.

    I found three completely different (to me, anyway) images within inches of each other. Having discovered these by moving with the camera hand-held, I then put the tripod in position, because the small aperture and low ISO (pristine texture needed here in the smooth areas) meant a slow shutter speed. Precise framing was essential: two shots with perfect symmetry, one with a centered and exactly vertical line.

    --Michael Freeman


    Michael Freeman's Personal Top Ten Tips from the Michael Freeman Digital Photography Reference System

    My personal ten top tips . . . ones that I actually follow myself.

    Youll find these and more in the kit, but Ive made a special short selection . . .

  • BCR: before going out to shoot, always check the three essentials that are easy to miss--Battery (you take it out to charge? Make sure you put it back)--memory Card (you take it out to download? Ditto!)--Raw (settings sometimes get changed, but shooting raw is essential because of what you can later pull out in processing).
  • Choose one mode and stick to it: Cameras offer too big a choice of shooting mode. Make life simple for yourself by choosing the one that youre most comfortable with--and dont change to others. I use A for aperture, almost always.
  • Know your shake rating: Know by practicing the slowest shutter speed at which you can guarantee to avoid camera shake. It varies with the lens focal length. Use the cameras anti-shake feature if it has one.
  • Think deep or shallow: Aperture controls not just exposure, but also depth of field. There are two ways to use it--selective focus on one detail from a wide aperture, or all-sharp from a small aperture. Decide what will best suit your subject before right from the start.
  • Expose for whats important: The most important exposure advice of all is to decide which subject in the frame is the most important, and expose for that. Only you can decide; the camera cant tell you.
  • Use the highlight clipping warning: The most valuable information on the back of your camera is the flashing warning that shows youve blown the highlights on the shot you just took. Heed it! Lower the exposure if necessary.
  • Archive the light: If the subject doesnt move (much), like a landscape or an interior, and if the lightings contrasty, shoot a range that varies the shutter speed by one or two stops. Reason: youve just archived the light, and can process it any way you like later.
  • Dont hesitate: All your camera settings are as they should be, right? If somethings happening in front of you, just shoot immediately. Hesitation or waiting will lose you that moment.
  • (But) Work the subject: Your first shot may be the best, but youll never know if you dont explore the subject. Stick around for a while, think about different camera angles, points of view, better moments.
  • Composition interesting or boring?: Yes, compositions a big subject and theres no one-size-fits-all guaranteed formula, but at the very least experiment with the framing and your camera position. Try off-centering, try tilting, try anything that will make the composition a little more interesting. Keep reminding yourself of this.
  • More editions of Michael Freeman's Digital Photography Reference System: The Complete Photographer's Library, in a Box:

  • Michael Freeman's Perfect Exposure: The Professional's Guide to Capturing Perfect Digital Photographs
    by Michael Freeman
    ISBN 0240811712 (0-240-81171-2)
    Softcover, Focal Press

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    Book summary:

    Clear, direct and guaranteed, the perfect exposure method looks at the way professionals work, and lays out the decisions and sequences with absolute clarity, while incorporating the latest, powerful post-processing techniques. Chosing the exposure for a photograph is infinitely complex and one of photography's most absorbing paradoxes because it affects everything in the image and its effect on the viewer. Understanding how and why exposure works is essential, not only because it helps you to decide what is instinctively "right," but this book will give you confidence in that decision--an invaluable skill for every single photographer. Full of beautiful photographs taken by Michael Freeman, this book will arm you with the tools you need for perfect exposure of your photographs.

    Michael Freeman is the author of the global bestseller, The Photographer's Eye.  Now published in sixteen languages, The Photographer's Eye continues to speak to photographers everywhere. Reaching 100,000 copies in print in the US alone, and 300,000+ worldwide, it shows how anyone can develop the ability to see and shoot great digital photographs.

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  • The Photographer's Eye Field Guide: The essential handbook for traveling with your digital SLR camera
    by Michael Freeman
    ISBN 0240812484 (0-240-81248-4)
    Softcover, Focal Press

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    Book summary:

    Whether on a weekend city break or a month-long trekking vacation, this handy litle guide will be your indispensable companion. Taking photos that really capture the essence of your time away is a real skill, and swamped with a multitude of choices, it can be hard to organise your time and focus on the shots that really matter.

    Written by Michael Freeman, one of the world's leading travel photographers, this portable mine of information takes a hands-on approach to travel photography, offering a comprehensive guide to planning and executing your trip. Advice covers everything and includes: choosing what to photograph and how to do it, coping with challenging lighting conditions, and negotiating customs and security issues.

    The subjects section covers a diverse array of settings, including: safaris, deserts, diving, cycling, mountains and water. This ensures that, whatever situation you encounter, you have the information you need to take stunning shots right at your fingertips.

    The themes section takes a more conceptual approach, and is packed with invaluable advice on situations you may encounter: shooting, for example, worship scenes, markets, landscapes and light. There is even a section on reworking cliches, so you can visit the much-photographed sites of the world and come away with something truly unique.

    Packed with stunning shots, and rooted entirely in the photographers own experiences, this is a highly practical approach to a key area of photography, and an inspirational guide for photographers on the move everywhere.

    Michael Freeman is the author of the global bestseller, The Photographer's Eye. Now published in sixteen languages, The Photographer's Eye continues to speak to photographers everywhere. Reaching 100,000 copies in print in the US alone, and 300,000+ worldwide, it shows how anyone can develop the ability to see and shoot great digital photographs.

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  • The Photographer's Eye: Graphic Guide: Composition and Design for Better Digital Photos
    by Michael Freeman
    ISBN 0240824261 (0-240-82426-1)
    Softcover, Focal Press

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    Book summary:

    Michael Freemans unrivalled compositional advice, first presented in the bestelling The Photographer's Eye, is explained in a new and deliberately visual manner in The Photographer's Eye Graphic Guide. Photography is a visual language in itself, and therefore lends perfectly to visual explanation. Drawing on his long professional experience as an editorial photographer, Michael Freeman shows exactly how images work by using a beguilingly simple technique. His unique style of illustration (which he does himself ) deconstructs photographs in a way that is clear, elegant and thoughtful. The information in this book can be absorbed in minutes, but last you a lifetime.

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  • The Photographer's Mind: Creative Thinking for Better Digital Photos
    by Michael Freeman
    ISBN 0240815173 (0-240-81517-3)
    Softcover, Focal Press

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    Book summary:

    Selected Images from The Photographer's Mind

    Bathed in light: composition, pose and lighting all move in the same direction--up towards the sun.




    A hidden landscape: inside a conch shell, but with none of the clues to suggest what it might be. A moment: the culmination of seven minutes and almost forty frames.


    Another Moment . . .: but an uncertain one.
    Amazon Exclusive: A Letter from Michael Freeman on The Photographer's Mind

    Dear Amazon Readers,

    Well, Ive written and photographed many books, and I was a little shocked when last month the 150th one appeared. A third of these are about photography, and you might think thats rather too many for one person to write. I mean, dont I have anything better to do? Valid question, but I like books--no, more than that, I have a strong belief in them--and as my work involves a lot of travelling, I have a great deal of time to think and write when Im on the road. In fact, Ive always spent a little more than half of each year travelling, and usually on long trips. Five or six weeks at a time is my ideal, though its sometimes longer by necessity. This isnt packaged tourism, of course, and many of the places Im in are a little quieter and more remote than you might expect. Perfect for thinking about writing, and this writing is also about what Im doing--shooting.

    Two and a half years ago I published The Photographers Eye, a book which at its core is about composition. This evolved from a much earlier book, long out of print. It always seemed to me that the word "technique" was usually being applied to the wrong things in photography. Technique was taken to mean twiddling knobs and working the controls, not to mention the arcana of imaging software. All very well, but what about the result? You could train yourself to fit a flash unit to the camera faster than a weapons expert could change magazines on a Kalashnikov, or learn to despise anyone who doesnt use Smart Objects in Photoshop, but if the image is boring at the end of it, what was the point?

    The techniques that always engaged me (and to be frank, most of the other professionals I know) have to do with image making, regardless of camera model or Photoshop version. My background is editorial assignment photography, usually features, so the pressure is always on to make the shot interesting. Its quite often about storytelling, and if Im trying to tell a part of that story clearly, I might (for instance) need to find a viewpoint and framing that relates one thing in the frame to another. Or, can I find a composition and scale that somehow encapsulates the mood and essence of the scene? Or, did another photographer I know already shoot this in a particular way, and how can I be different and better?

    Composition isnt about the Rule of Thirds (spare me, please!) and getting the framing perfect. There is no perfect. But neither is it vague and happy-feely. There are real techniques that involve knowing what the frame shape is doing to you, how the eye and mind tend to respond to visual stimuli, and how to create the right balance between surprise and comfort simply by the proportion you allocate to elements In the frame. And because these techniques involve choice of subject and being certain of what youre trying to achieve (for instance, make the scene lush and lovable, or shock the pants off the audience), composition reaches much, much further than placing points and lines in a rectangle.

    Well, if I go on much more, this will begin to be a book! And there already is one . . . its the sequel to The Photographers Eye, and its called The Photographers Mind. It exists because there was much more that I wanted to say than I was able to in Eye.

    Theres even a little bit more that I couldnt fit into this, either. One thing I touch on in the book is the deep effect of frame shape, and in particular a new trend towards wider. 16:9 is rapidly gaining ground as a "natural" format (aspect ratio, actually) because of HDTV, and a few cameras offer this framing. And of course, its shape alone has an effect on composing that is noticeably different from 3:2 and 4:3. Here are four examples, each illustrating a different effect:

    Pushes the attention outwards to left and right--gives a panoramic feeling. Squeezes top and bottom--less foreground, less sky. Encourages the "two-shot"--one object left vs. one object right. Strengthens any left-right movement that the scene may already have.
    What Kind of Photographer Are You?
    A Photo Personality Quiz

    Do you know how to read a histogram?
  • More or less
  • Fairly well, and Im getting better all the time
  • Of course! What a nerve to ask!
  • Which of the following photographers do you most admire?
  • Trent Parke
  • Irving Penn
  • Ansel Adams
  • Myself
  • If we were going to give you a free gift (which were not. so dont build your hopes up), which of the following would you prefer?
  • A years invitations to opening nights at the photo gallery of your choice
  • A coffee-table book on grand American landscapes
  • The latest Ukrainian software to do something amazing to your image
  • Which of the following have you photographed the most in the last year?
  • People
  • Landscape
  • Fire hydrant
  • Detail of a wall
  • Gas station
  • How many times in the last week have you visited online photo forums?
  • 0-10
  • 10-50
  • 50 plus
  • Imagining you didnt already have these, which would you prefer as your next lens?
  • An 85mm ’1.4
  • A 105mm Macro
  • A lens that bends, swings or tilts
  • Good composition is . . .
  • Interesting contrast between elements
  • Rule of Thirds
  • Getting it all inside the frame
  • Its more important to get it sharp, because you can fix the composition later
  • What is your favorite kind of lighting?
  • Anything unusual
  • Backlighting
  • Sunset and sunrise
  • Frontal and crisp
  • Flash
  • Helmut Newton was holding a DSLR and said, Its all automatic. All I have to do is press the button. He then pointed to his head and said, Its all in here. Did he mean . . .
  • The camera is irrelevant
  • He understood exactly how the camera works
  • This camera is a miracle of modern engineering
  • How did you score? Add up the numbers for each answer you checked . . .

    10-16
    Either you have a passion for shooting, or you cheated because you guessed that a low score would be best. Even if the latter, at least you wanted to look like a photographer rather than a techno-geek, so you wont be disappointed to find that this new book is completely about thinking and shooting pictures, with not a piece of a camera kit or a computer screen anywhere in sight!

    17-24
    What a balanced, reasonable and moderate individual you are! The alternative would be that you couldnt really make up your mind, but that cant be true, can it? Anyway, I really envy you for steering clear of extremes. Guess what . . . youll find an equally balanced view of the range of photographic expression and style in this book!

    25-33
    You just might need a little more excitement in your photographic life. Moreover, youll go pasty-faced from sitting in front of the computer screen. Recommendation: close it down, spend an hour reading this book, then go out with the camera and take at least two photographs of a kind youve never tried before.

    Funny how this book seems to be good for everyone, isnt it? Admittedly, youll still need the camera manual. But please dont write to me saying how unfair and opinionated the test was, because thats what these quizzes are all about!

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  • The Photographer's Studio Manual (0004119223) by MICHAEL FREEMAN
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    The Photographer's Studio Manual
    by Michael Freeman
    ISBN 0004119223 (0-00-411922-3)
    Hardcover, COLLINS

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    Book summary:

    This book covers comprehensively all the aspects of interior photography.

  • MICHAEL FREEMAN: PHOTOGRAPHER'S TROUBLESHOOTER
    PHOTOGRAPHER'S TROUBLESHOOTER
    by Michael Freeman
    ISBN 0356093883 (0-356-09388-3)
    Hardcover, MACDONALD

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  • Photoschool (0333345622) by Freeman, Michael
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    Photoschool
    by Michael Freeman
    ISBN 0333345622 (0-333-34562-2)
    Softcover, Papermac

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  • Provence: The Beautiful Cookbook: Authentic Recipes from the Regions of Provence (0002551543) by Richard Olney
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    Provence: The Beautiful Cookbook: Authentic Recipes from the Regions of Provence
    by Richard Olney, Michael Freeman
    ISBN 0002551543 (0-00-255154-3)
    Hardcover, HarperCollins Publishers

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    Book summary:

    Provence is loved for its sunlit beauty and earthy, tantalizing cuisine. Both are celebrated in Provence the Beautiful Cookbook, an oversized (more than two feet tall!) picture and cookbook of breathtaking color photos and authentic regional recipes. The 270 recipes, compiled and written by award-winning food book author Richard Olney, include soups and starters; seafood, meat, game, and poultry dishes; vegetable and grain specialties; and simple but luscious desserts. Readers seeking an armchair tour of the region, singularly depicted, and the chance to see and reproduce its dishes, will delight in the book, which would also make a welcome gift.

    Beginning with an introduction to the land and its cooking, the book then weaves short essays about the Provençal regions with recipes arranged by courses. There are exemplary versions of bouillabaisse and bourride (the creamy, garlic-infused fish chowder), estouffade (braised beef, here with olives and mushrooms), daubs (stews), vegetable-filled omelets, and tians (savory gratins). Less familiar treasures include a mixed herb pasta from Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, porgy with crab sauce from the Var, a braised stuffed lamb shoulder from Vaucluse, zucchini and rice gratin from the Alpes Maritimes, and dried figs in thyme and red wine syrup, also from the Var. The recipes reflect Olney's unerring palate and dedication to tradition; some cooks may find certain dishes beyond their reach, but all will discover approachable recipes that are easily made. Wine information and a glossary conclude the portrait of Provence and its table--a feast for the eye and palate alike. --Arthur Boehm

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  • Railways and the Victorian Imagination (0300079702) by Freeman, Michael
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    Railways and the Victorian Imagination
    by Michael Freeman
    ISBN 0300079702 (0-300-07970-2)
    Hardcover, Yale University Press

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    Book summary:

    This book offers a new cultural history of the railway age in Britain. As the newly constructed railways transformed the landscape and the economics of nineteenth-century Britain, they transformed the very culture itself, and this richly illustrated account records and illuminates that transformation.

    From geological studies to the walls of the Royal Academy; from rapidly growing atheism to innovative games for children; from Darwinism to the temples of capitalism -- almost every aspect of human endeavor was informed by and related to the developing railway. Musical scores that sought to mimic the rhythms of steam locomotion and libraries of books devised to be read on trains and sold at station book stalls were just some of the consequences of feats of physical engineering that exceeded all previous undertakings, and of joint-stock companies larger by far than the East India Company or any other previously in existence. These developments also brought about new attitudes to time, to distance and consequently to employment, to leisure, and to life itself. This lively book recovers through its images, its anecdotes, and its arguments the life and the world that the railways made.

    The cultural dimension of the railway age is often overshadowed by its mechanical and physical elements. Here, the very centrality of the railway in the literary, artistic, and imaginative life of the nation is set side by side with its financial, speculative, and economic dimension to provide a highly original and fascinating insight into the realities of Victorian life.

  • Sudan: The Land and the People (029598533X) by Carney, Timothy
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    Sudan: The Land and the People
    by Timothy Carney, Victoria Butler, Michael Freeman
    ISBN 029598533X (0-295-98533-X)
    Hardcover, Marquand Books

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    Book summary:

    Sudan: The Land and the People presents the whole of Africa's largest country. Nearly one-third the size of the United States, Sudan sprawls over more than one million square miles. Here for more than a thousand years Arabs and Africans have collided and blended to produce people who share a turbulent history and rich cultural heritage. Arab and African alike divide into tribes. More than 350 unique languages, customs, and artistic traditions combine to form the ethnic patchwork of Africa's most diverse country. Internatonally renowned photographer Michael Freeman traveled the lenght and breadth of Sudan to capture these extraordinary photos of modern Sudan.

    Sudanese diversity begins with its geography. Deserts, salt-washed seacoast, riverine and forest lushness, rock and hill and dry wash, lake and stream, rapids and cascades all catch the eye and challenge human resource. Sudan's richness is not only in its water, minerals, and oil, but in its ethnic and cultural mixture. Its promise lies in a durable end to conflict through acceptance of its plurality and diveristy to realize prosperity for an entire region.

  • The Taste of Thailand (0020091303) by Bhumichitr, Vatcharin
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    The Taste of Thailand
    by Vatcharin Bhumichitr, Clive Streeter, Michael Freeman
    ISBN 0020091303 (0-02-009130-3)
    Softcover, Wiley

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    Book summary:

    This lavishly illustrated cookbook provides an introdution not only to Thai cooking but to Thailand's history and culture as well. The author describes Thai ingredients and cooking techniques, preparing readers for the 130 tempting recipes. Full-color photos complement the text.

  • Thirty-Five Millimeter Handbook (0070837295) by Freeman, Michael
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    Thirty-Five Millimeter Handbook
    by Michael Freeman
    ISBN 0070837295 (0-07-083729-5)
    Hardcover, Mcgraw-Hill

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  • Victorians and the Prehistoric: Tracks to a Lost World (0300103344) by Freeman, Michael
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    Victorians and the Prehistoric: Tracks to a Lost World
    by Michael Freeman
    ISBN 0300103344 (0-300-10334-4)
    Hardcover, Yale University Press

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    Book summary:

    As the Victorians excavated the earth to create canals and railways in the early part of the nineteenth century, geological discoveries brought to light new narratives of the prehistoric, ideas that resounded in British society, art, and literature of the period. This engaging and generously illustrated book explores the Victorian fascination with all things prehistoric.

    Michael Freeman shows how men and women were both energized and unsettled by the realization that the formation of the earth over hundreds of millions of years and Darwins theories about the origins of life contradicted what they had read in the Bible. He describes the rock and fossil collecting craze that emerged, the sources of inspiration and imagery discovered by writers and artists, and the new importance of geologists and paleontologists. He also discusses the cathedral-like museums that sprang up in cities and towns, shrines to all that was progressive in the age but still clothed in the trappings of traditional ideas.

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